5th Joint Meeting of ESPU-SPU - Virtual

SN1: ESPU-Nurses: Lower Urinary Tract

Moderators: Babett Jetzkavski, Sweden

ESPU-Nurses Meeting on Saturday 25, September 2021, 10:00 - 10:40


10:00 - 10:10
SN1-1 (OP)

LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP RESULTS OF GIGGLE INCONTINENCE DIAGNOSED IN CHILDHOOD

Sanghee JO 1, Jihye HWANG 1, Yoonhye JI 1, Yongseung LEE 2, Sangwon HAN 2 and Sangwoon KIM 2
1) Yonsei university health system, Pediatric urology, Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA - 2) Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University of College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA

PURPOSE

Giggle incontinence is a rare condition in which is characterized with extensive emptying or leakage during or immediately after laughing. The progress of giggle incontinence with long-term follow-up has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term follow-up results of giggle incontinence diagnosed in childhood.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children who was diagnosed as giggle incontinence between 2006 and 2019. Among thirty patients over the current age of 13 years, a telephone survey was conducted on 19 patients. A telephone survey evaluated current voiding symptoms by overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) and investigated current status of giggle incontinence.

RESULTS

Seven of the patients were male and 12 were female, with an average age of 11.4 years at diagnosis. A mean duration of follow up was 63.4 months and mean age was 18.1 years at survey. In telephone survey, a total of 84.2% of patients reported a complete improvement in giggle incontinence, with a partial improvement in the remaining 15.8% of patients. The mean of OABSS was 0.41±0.6 and the presence of accompanied urgency at diagnosis was not related with the improvement of giggle incontinence. The timing of improvement in giggle incontinence was 15.4 years on average.

CONCLUSIONS

Childhood giggle incontinence was improved with maturation in all of patients. Most patients may experience a significant improvement in giggle incontinence, mainly after puberty.


10:10 - 10:20
SN1-2 (OP)

FUNCTIONAL CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN - A QUALITATIVE EXPLORATION OF PARENT'S EXPERIENCES OF HOME-BASED TREATMENT

Gunilla FLANKEGÅRD 1, Evalotte MÖRELIUS 2, Karel DUCHEN 3 and Patrik RYTTERSTRÖM 4
1) Division of Caring Sciences and Reproductive Health, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Science, HMV, Linköping University, Norrköping, SWEDEN - 2) School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edit Cowan University, Perth, AUSTRALIA - 3) Division of Children's and Womens Health, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, SWEDEN - 4) Division of Caring Sciences and Reproductive Health, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, HMV, Linköping University, Norrköping, SWEDEN

PURPOSE

Functional constipation in children is a common worldwide problem. Oral and rectal treatment is often carried out at home by parents. The recurrence rate is high with long treatment periods and low adherence. The aim of the study was to explore parent's experiences of treating functional constipation at home.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

A phenomenological design was used with a reflective lifeworld research approach (Dahlberg et.al. 2008). Interviews were conducted in 2019 with ten mothers and five fathers. Their children (age range 1-14 years) had functional constipation with homebased oral and rectal treatment. The duration of symptoms ranged between 0.5-10 years. Open-ended questions were used starting from the description of a day with constipation treatment. A reflective and open bridled approach characterized the analysis. Meaning units formed clusters and a structure that illuminated the meaning of the phenomenon.

RESULTS

Preliminary results show that the treatment situation creates a tension between the will to be a good, caring, protecting parent and the need to give treatment despite resistance from the child. Parents experience feelings of abusing the child and sometimes having to act against their own will, questioning themselves about their parenting style.

CONCLUSIONS

Treating functional constipation at home puts parents in crisis. This illustrates the importance of support from healthcare professionals to the families. A prompt management from healthcare professionals is vital to increase adherence to the treatment and prevent unnecessary lingering in the healthcare system.


10:20 - 10:30
SN1-3 (OP)

NEW ONLINE TRAINING COURSE FOR TEACHERS OF CHILDREN WITH FUNCTIONAL URINARY INCONTINENCE

Karin BUEHLER MEYER 1, Irene ZULLIGER 2, Barbara SCHAERER 3 and Mazen ZEINO 4
1) Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Bern; Inselspital Bern, Department of Pediatric Urology, Bern, SWITZERLAND - 2) University of Bern; Inselspital Bern,, Department Technology and Innovation, competence center easylearn, Bern, SWITZERLAND - 3) University of Bern; Inselspital Bern, Department of Nursing, Medical-Technical and Medical Therapeutic Areas, Bern, SWITZERLAND - 4) Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Bern; Inselspital Bern, Department of paediatric urology, Bern, SWITZERLAND

PURPOSE

Urinary incontinence in children is a common problem. Although Switzerland is a highly developed country with good infrastructure, children tend to avoid toilet use in schools as hygiene is inadequate and access to is often restricted. Furthermore, teachers experience with children with bladder dysfunction is limited. These factors may negatively impact children's bladder health. In order to improve the outcome in these children, an online training course for teachers has been established.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

A newly developed online course for teachers explains normal bladder function and causes for urinary incontinence with suitable illustrations and video content. It highlights the need for support in children with bladder dysfunction. Various measures to improve toilet use in schools are described. An online feedback formulary was added to this tool.

RESULTS

Since October 2019, this training is freely accessible on the website of our university hospital, department of pediatric urology. The first feedbacks were positive and encouraging, in about 75% even the highest rating score (5/5) was selected.

CONCLUSIONS

If teachers provide targeted support to children with dysfunctional voiding, they can help to improve their self-esteem and self-efficacy. With the knowledge from the course, children, parents and teachers can make individual agreements, which enables children to continue their therapy for urinary incontinence in school environment successfully.


10:30 - 10:40
Discussion/Question